2012

BOSTON SUMMIT

summit.ImmersiveEducation.org

iED 2012 PROGRAM & SCHEDULE OF EVENTS

.

iED 2012 BOSTON SUMMIT SCHEDULE

 GREEN  General interest or practitioner session

  RED   Research, technical or developer session

THURSDAY, JUNE 14

8:30 am - 9:00 am Badge Pick-up and Coffee Service

9:00 am - 10:00 am Welcome, Opening Remarks and Major Announcements

| Inside Immersive Education, Breaking News and Major Announcements

| Aaron E. Walsh, Director, Immersive Education Initiative

10:00 am - 10:15 am European Chapter of Immersive Education (iED Europe)

| iED Europe: One Year On, The Year Ahead

| Michael Gardner, Chair, iED Europe

10:15 am - 11:15 am KEYNOTE

| Mixed Reality Co-Creative Learning Environments

| Victor Callaghan, University of Essex, United Kingdom

11:15 am - 12:15 pm Papers   BOSTON ROOM

| Interaction Metaphors for Driving STEM Education Game Development 


| | Mediated Dialogues through Multiple Networked Avatars

11:15 am - 12:15 pm Presentations, Demonstrations and Outliers

| | Modeling Eating Behaviors Through Mixed-Reality

| | iGlobe PersonalPlanet

12:30 pm - 2:00 pm Lunch, Coffee Service and Poster Sessions

| iED 2012 Poster Sessions

| Activating Advanced Learners – Integrating Simulation into the Nursing
| Synthesis Curriculum at Boston College

| The Possible Role Of ‘Serious Cognitive Gaming’ In Health Care

| | Assisting the Last of the Luddites:  Immersive Professional Development for
| | Educational Technologists, via a Quasi Alternate Reality Game (qARG)

| | Interactive Environments as Pedagogical Tools: Learning from Worked
| | Examples in Scratch and Alice

2:00 pm - 3:30 pm Papers   BOSTON ROOM

| Guidance in Game-Based Virtual Learning: Lessons from Developing iSocial 


| Surrogate Embodied Learning in MUVEs: Enhancing Memory and Motivation
| through Embodiment


| | Active Learning in a Digital Dome with the Living Forest

2:00 pm - 3:30 pm Presentations, Demonstrations and Outliers

| | Virtual Spaces For Online Role-Play: Combining 2D and 3D Worlds

| Innovative Laboratory Component for Social Science Courses

| | The Cincinnati Riverfront 1848: A Historical Immersive Experience

3:30 pm - 4:00 Beverages and Light Snack

4:00 pm - 4:45 Panel Discussion

| The Challenge and Reward of Full, Augmented and Mixed Reality (FAM)
| in the Classroom

Panelists:

Jeffrey Jacobson, PublicVR and iED FAM.TWG co-chair

Victor Callaghan, University of Essex, United Kingdom

Jon Dorbolo, Oregon State University and iED Oregon Board Member

Jennifer B. Elliott, University of Cincinnati

Marc Lalley, iGlobe Inc.

6:30 pm - 8:30 pm Evening Social Event

6:30 pm - 8:30 pm BOSTON HARBOR SUNSET BOAT CRUISE

Boston Harbor Cruise tickets will be provided when you pick up your badge. Badges and boat tickets may be picked up Thursday morning starting at 8:00 am or during the lunch break on Thursday. Boarding starts at 6:30 PM near the New England Aquarium in downtown Boston (address and map links below). The boat departs promptly at 7:00 PM. All attendees must begin boarding at 6:30 PM.

Boston Harbor Cruises is located by the New England Aquarium in downtown Boston.  Budget 1 hour to travel from Boston College to Boston Harbor Cruises.

Additional details will be provided during the closing session on Thursday, at which time a group will depart for the boat on the Green Line “T” (train). If you wish to travel with the group bring $2.00 to purchase your T ticket.

MAPS AND DIRECTIONS:

Boston Harbor Cruises

1 Long Wharf, Boston MA

(617) 227-4321

Google Map: Available Here

  1. From Boston College: Take the Green Line T (train) to the Government Center stop. Exit the Government Center T stop and walk directly across the plaza, down the brick steps, and through Faneuil Hall to the New England Aquarium. Boston Harbor Cruises is located to the left of the New England Aquarium. T (train) tickets are $2.00 each.

  1. More Directions (if you are not coming from Boston College): Available Here

 

FRIDAY, JUNE 15

8:30 am - 9:00 am Badge Pick-up and Coffee Service

9:00 am - 10:00 am KEYNOTE

| Using Immersive Virtual Environments to Create Immersive
| Science Assessments

| Diane Jass Ketelhut, University of Maryland, USA

10:00 am - 11:00 Introducing New Chapters of the Immersive Education Initiative

| MidAmerica Chapter of Immersive Education (iED MidAmerica)

| Levi Martson, Chair, iED MidAmerica

| NorthWest Americas Chapter of Immersive Education (iED NorthWest Americas)

| Jonathon Richter, Chair, iED NorthWest Americas

| Brazil, Argentina, Uruguai Chapter of Immersive Education (iED BAU)

| Liane Tarouco, Chair, iED BAU

| Australian Chapter of Immersive Education (iED Australia)

| Farzad Safaei, Chair, iED Australia

11:00 am - 12:30 pm Papers and Presentations    BOSTON ROOM

| VEGA - Virtual Environment for Geometry Acquaintance

| Assessment of Learning in a Marginalized Population of Adults in an Immersive
|
 Virtual Environment

| | Resident Evil 5 and General Education in Singaporean Classroom

11:00 am - 12:30 am Presentations, Demos, and Outliers

| Java Learning Path in Immersive Education

| Questing The 7 C’s: Integrating Collaboration, Creativity, Critical Thinking and

| Computing In Cross-Cultural Community To Engage Diverse Learners In Game

| Development

| Virtual Forensic Learning Lab Series

12:30 pm - 1:30 pm Lunch (Break-outs & On Your Own)

1:30 pm - 2:00 pm Coffee Service, Poster Sessions

| iED 2012 Poster Sessions

        

| Activating Advanced Learners – Integrating Simulation into the Nursing
| Synthesis Curriculum at Boston College

| The Possible Role Of ‘Serious Cognitive Gaming’ In Health Care

| | Assisting the Last of the Luddites:  Immersive Professional Development for
| | Educational Technologists, via a Quasi Alternate Reality Game (qARG)

| | Interactive Environments as Pedagogical Tools: Learning from Worked
| | Examples in Scratch and Alice

2:00 pm - 4:00 pm     NEWTON ROOM
| Library and Museums Technology Working Group (LAM.TWG) Meeting
| Full, Augmented and Mixed Reality Technology Working Group (FAM.TWG) Meeting

2:00 pm - 4:00 pm Presentations, Demonstrations and Outliers

| Espurnik 3D Network, The Knowledge Virtual World. Real 21st Century Skills

| Classroom Experiences Based On Opensim And Aurora-Sim

| Pedagogy in Fantasy World Design

| | iSee - Education And Collaboration In An Immersive Environment

| The realXtend Platform For Virtual Worlds, Featuring the Smithsonian Latino
| Virtual Museum's Virtual Watershed Initiative and Other Virtual Worlds

2:00 pm - 4:00 pm Presentations, Demonstrations and Outliers     BOSTON ROOM

| Open Wonderland Showcase

| | The 10 Cube Challenge: Using Virtual Worlds to Foster Creative Thinking 

4:00 pm - 4:30 Coffee Service

4:30 pm - 5:15 Panel Discussion

| Commercial Video Games as Stealth Learning Environments : What Do  

| They Teach Us?

Panelists:

Dan Green, Oracle, iED MidAmerica Board Member and iED K-12.TWG co-chair

Toni Alatalo, realXtend Association and Playsign Ltd.

Boon-Yong Kwok,  Singapore Polytechnic

Stefan Rasporich, Calgary Arts Academy

Darin Hughes, University of Central Florida

8:00 pm - 9:30 pm Chapter BoG Meeting and Evening Social Event

        Immersive Education Chapters Board of Governors (BoG) Meeting and Social

SATURDAY, JUNE 16

9:00 am - 10:00 am Badge Pick-up and Coffee Service

10:00 am - 10:30 am  iED 2012 : DIRECTOR'S CLOSING COMMENTS

10:30 am - 11:30 am KEYNOTE

| Blending Virtual and Augmented Realities for Learning Ecosystems
| Chris Dede, Harvard Graduate School of Education, USA

11:30 am - 12:30 pm KEYNOTE HANDS-ON LAPTOP WORKSHOP

| EcoMUVE: Learning About Ecosystems Through Immersion in Virtual Worlds

| Shari J. Metcalf

11:30 am - 2:30 pm  Workshops (Hands-on Workshops) and Presentations    BOSTON ROOM

| Cyberlearning and Second Language Conversational Competence [30 min]

| Math Problem Solving with Online Coaches [30 min]

| Building Logic in Scratch, Minecraft and Java for Gamers [60 min]

| Kinect, Wedo, Picoboards and Alternative Inputs With Scratch [60 min]

2:00 pm - 2:30 pm Coffee Service & Poster Sessions

| iED 2012 Poster Sessions

2:30 pm - 4:30 pm Workshops (Hands-on Laptop Workshops)  

| Build It! Asteroids Game Workshop - Computational Thinking Concepts Using Scratch 

| Build It! Little Crab Game Workshop - Computational Thinking Concepts Using Scratch

2:00 pm - 4:30 pm Workshops (Hands-on) and “Late Breaking” Sessions   BOSTON ROOM

| Scriptastic [45 min hands-on workshop]

| Blending Informal & Formal Learning in Offline/Online Environments [15 min demo]

| Learn to Build an Open Wonderland World [90 min workshop]

iED 2012
SPEAKERS and SESSIONS

1. WELCOME and OPENING REMARKS


Inside Immersive Education, Breaking News and Major Announcements

Aaron E. Walsh, Director, Immersive Education Initiative

2. KEYNOTES


Blending Virtual and Augmented Realities for Learning Ecosystems
Chris Dede, Harvard Graduate School of Education, USA



Using Immersive Virtual Environments to Create Immersive Science Assessments
Diane Jass Ketelhut, University of Maryland, USA



Mixed Reality Co-Creative Learning Environments
Victor Callaghan, University of Essex, United Kingdom

3. REFEREED PAPERS (TECHNICAL PAPERS)

VEGA - Virtual Environment for Geometry Acquaintance

Assessment of Learning in a Marginalized Population of Adults in an Immersive Virtual Environment


Interaction Metaphors for Driving STEM Education Game Development


Guidance in Game-Based Virtual Learning: Lessons from Developing iSocial


Surrogate Embodied Learning in MUVEs: Enhancing Memory and Motivation through Embodiment


Mediated Dialogues through Multiple Networked Avatars


Active Learning in a Digital Dome with the Living Forest


An Exploration of 360° Film and Immersive Environments for Educational Purposes

4. PRESENTATIONS

Questing The 7 C’s: Integrating Collaboration, Creativity, Critical Thinking And Computing In Cross-Cultural Community To Engage Diverse Learners In Game Development

The 10 Cube Challenge: Using Virtual Worlds to Foster Creative Thinking

Resident Evil 5 and General Education in Singaporean Classroom

Open Wonderland Showcase

Espurnik 3D Network, The Knowledge Virtual World. Real 21st Century Skills Classroom Experiences Based On Opensim And Aurora-Sim

Virtual Spaces For Online Role-Play: Combining 2D And 3D Worlds

Java Learning Path in Immersive Education

Pedagogy in Fantasy World Design

Virtual Forensic Learning Lab Series

Modeling Eating Behaviors Through Mixed-Reality

Immersive Landscapes, Digital Panoramic Photography For The Fulldome

5. POSTERS

Activating Advanced Learners – Integrating Simulation into the Nursing Synthesis Curriculum at Boston College

The Possible Role Of ‘Serious Cognitive Gaming’ In Health Care

Assisting the Last of the Luddites:  Immersive Professional Development for Educational Technologists, via a Quasi Alternate Reality Game (qARG)

Interactive Environments as Pedagogical Tools: Learning from Worked Examples in Scratch and Alice

6. PANELS


The Challenge and Reward of Full, Augmented and Mixed Reality (FAM) in the Classroom


Commercial Video Games as Stealth Learning Environments : What Do They Teach Us?

7. WORKSHOPS

Building Logic in Scratch, Minecraft and Java for Gamers [HANDS-ON]

EcoMUVE: Learning About Ecosystems Through Immersion in Virtual Worlds [HANDS-ON]

Learn to Build an Open Wonderland World [HANDS-ON]

Kinect, Wedo, Picoboards and Alternative Inputs With Scratch [HANDS-ON]

Math Problem Solving with Online Coaches [HANDS-ON]

Build It! Asteroids Game Workshop - Computational Thinking Concepts Using Scratch [HANDS-ON]

Build It! Little Crab Game Workshop - Computational Thinking Concepts Using Scratch [HANDS-ON]

8. DEMOS

Cyberlearning and Second Language Conversational Competence

The Cincinnati Riverfront 1848: A Historical Immersive Experience

Blending Informal and Formal learning in Offline and Online Environments

9. OUTLIERS

Innovative Laboratory Component for Social Science Courses

iGlobe PersonalPlanet

iSee - Education And Collaboration In An Immersive Environment

The realXtend Platform For Virtual Worlds -- Featuring Smithsonian Latino Virtual Museum's Virtual Watershed Initiative And Other Worlds

10. LATE-BREAKING RESEARCH & TECHNOLOGY

11. CHAPTER EVENTS

12. TECHNOLOGY WORKING GROUP EVENTS

13. SOCIAL  EVENTS

1. WELCOME and OPENING REMARKS

Inside Immersive Education, Breaking News, Major Announcements

Aaron E. Walsh, Director, Immersive Education Initiative

2. KEYNOTES

KEYNOTE:

Blending Virtual and Augmented Realities for Learning Ecosystems
Chris Dede, Harvard Graduate School of Education, USA

[overview and video]

Chris Dede

Timothy E. Wirth Professor in

Learning Technologies

Harvard Graduate School of Education, USA

In his keynote address Chris will share with iED 2012 attendees the early findings of new research into combining immersive virtual environments and real ecosystems with digital resources. His keynote, based on the EcoMUVE and EcoMOBILE research projects at Harvard’s Graduate School of Education, will present a variety of ways in which immersive virtual environments and augmented realities complement each other in student motivation and learning.

Immediately following Dede’s keynote address attendees will have the opportunity to participate in a hands-on workshop conducted by Shari Metcalf, Project Director of EcoMUVE and EcoMOBILE at Harvard. The workshop, EcoMUVE: Learning About Ecosystems through Immersion in Virtual Worlds, is open to all iED 2012 attendees. [overview and video]

KEYNOTE:

Using Immersive Virtual Environments to Create Immersive Science Assessments
Diane Jass Ketelhut, University of Maryland, USA

[video]

Diane Jass Ketelhut

Associate Professor of Science,

Technology and Math Education

University of Maryland, USA

Situated Assessment using Virtual Environments for Science Content and Inquiry, SAVE Science, is an NSF-funded study developing an innovative system for contextualized, authentic assessment of learning in science. In SAVE Science, we are creating, implementing, and evaluating a series of immersive virtual environment-based modules for assessing both science content and inquiry in the middle grades. The modules are designed to enable students to perform a series of assessment tasks that provide data about how well they have mastered and can apply content knowledge and inquiry skills taught via their regular classroom curricula. We hypothesize that through careful design of the virtual environment-based assessments, data can be collected and analyzed to produce meaningful and accurate inferences about student learning that provide additional insights about student understanding beyond what is possible from more traditional assessments. With videos and web links, this article describes the project, each module, and the associated structures facilitating implementation, concluding with a link to download an example module and opportunities to join the research team. [video]

KEYNOTE:

Mixed Reality Co-Creative Learning Environments
Victor Callaghan, University of Essex, United Kingdom

Victor Callaghan

Professor of Computer Science,

Intelligent Environments Group leader,

Digital Lifestyles Centre director

 

University of Essex, United Kingdom

In his keynote, Victor will describe the work that he and his colleagues are doing at Essex University towards the establishment of a mixed reality co-creative learning environment which aims to allow teams of geographically distributed students to collaborate on building Internet-of-Things laboratory assignments. The project makes use of a novel immersive reality desk, a bespoke set of networked 'Internet-of-Things' modules, supporting software and a constructionist pedagogy that collectively form a mixed reality teaching environment that allows students to combine physical and virtual entities to build educational projects. As part of the presentation Victor will describe the technologies in more details, especially the immersive reality desk and the 'Internet-of-Things' educational modules. The concept itself arose from an Intel funded initiative, Creative-Science, that aims to support innovation in technology based product design, business and education, all of which will be described in this talk.

3. REFEREED PAPERS (TECHNICAL PAPERS)

PAPER:

VEGA - Virtual Environment for Geometry Acquaintance

Authors: Liane Tarouco, Érico Amaral, Barbara Avila, Herik Zednik

Affiliations: Graduate Program in Information Technology in Education, Federal University of Rio Grande Sul

Abstract: Based on the functionalities available in OpenSim, a virtual laboratory was developed in which students can interact with graphic representations and evaluate their features, improving their knowledge of geometry. Among the available authoring tools, a highlight is SketchUp, used for the design and modeling of laboratory components, with the support of the Firestorm viewer, which establishes the importance of meshes within OpenSim. With the implementation of the proposed environment an effort is made to reach a level of interaction that allows students to join the virtual world in an effective and autonomous manner, in order to manage their learning process within an interactive space. The article will describe the experience of constructing the objects and integrating them in the virtual immersion environment, touching on the strategies adopted to facilitate and simplify this process with the view of involving both teachers and students as authors.

PAPER: 

Assessment of Learning in a Marginalized Population of Adults in an Immersive Virtual Environment

Authors:

Mary Leah Coco, Ph.D.

School of Human Resource Education and Workforce Development

Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College

Krisanna Machtmes, Ph.D.

Associate Professor, School of Human Resource Education and Workforce Development

Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College

Glynn Cavin, Ph.D.

Director, Transportation Training and Education Center

Louisiana Transportation Research Center

Erastus N. Ndinguri, Doctoral Candidate

Graduate Teaching Associate, School of Human Resource Education and Workforce Development

Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College

Abstract:

Since the year 2003, 6,438 individuals have been killed in a highway construction or maintenance work zone, which is approximately 805 deaths per calendar year (National Work Zone Safety Information Clearinghouse, 2010).

The purpose of this research was to test the Immersive Virtual Learning Environment (IVLE) simulation of real-world highway work zones. IVLEs go beyond traditional visual learning by presenting images that combine a new form of visual learning with virtual-experiential learning in a way that is more congruent with an individual’s visual images stored in memory, thus improving knowledge transfer and retention Such immersive engagement in the learning activity will allow the learners to move beyond the memorization of the presented concepts and into the application and synthesis of the material.

This research expanded the scientific knowledge of adult education specifically that which deals with knowledge transfer in an IVLE as it enhances and supplements traditional learning through blended delivery methodology for semi-skilled workers representing a seldom studied group.

To test that hypothesis, a diverse sample of 305 highway maintenance workers who participated in 15 blended IVLE classes; seven classes were control (n=140) and eight were experimental (n=165). Demographics, pre and post-intervention subject matter knowledge, were measured. Individuals that had previously completed a flagger course scored higher than those that had not.  All individuals were able to learn in the immersive virtual classroom despite their educational background.

PAPER:

Interaction Metaphors for Driving STEM Education Game Development

Authors: Darin Hughes 1, Lori Walters 1, Robb Lindgren 2

Affiliations:

1 Synthetic Reality Laboratory, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL  32816.

2 School of Visual Arts and Design, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816.

Abstract:

This paper presents a set of learning metaphors and their use in an immersive downloadable 3D experience that is set in the backdrop of the 1964/65 New York World's Fair (NYWF)   a National Science Foundation (NSF) funded project.  These metaphors are applied selectively to the creation of seven mini-games: Follow the Stars (Polynesian navigation), Sea Hunt (deep sea ecology), Meteorites (Antarctic meteorite identification), Journey into the Earth (West Virginia coal mining), ChemLab (chemical reactions), Pythagoras's Music Challenge (math and music theory), and Plant Invaders (invasive species in man-made lakes).

Educational content is delivered using a wide variety of modalities throughout the NYWF experience in the form of virtual artifacts, souvenirs, pop-ups, voice-over recordings, videos, talking avatars, and other in-game experiences.  In addition to the educational materials found within the virtual fair, individual science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) discovery points and games provide content-appropriate knowledge associated with a particular pavilion.  In order to account for a wide range of learning and teaching strategies, the following educational metaphors have been applied as part of the experience design: learning by seeing/hearing, doing, playing, creating, and sharing.  

Each module makes use of one or more of these metaphors in order to provide a wide range of learning strategies and levy the advantages and disadvantages of any individual approach.  Furthermore, this process mimics that of the scientist and the artist, who must study others’ work, create his/her own work, and disseminate this work for peer review.

One Sentence Summary: We present an ontological description of STEM game development in the context of a virtual recreation of the 1964/65 New York World’s Fair.

PAPER:

Guidance in Game-Based Virtual Learning: Lessons from Developing iSocial

Authors:  James Laffey, Krista Galyen, Ryan Babiuch

Affiliations: University of Missouri

Abstract:

Our paper presents a framework for designing guidance in game-based virtual learning. The framework has evolved from lessons learned during our work in developing iSocial.

iSocial is a multi-user 3D VLE being developed with support from a Goal 2 IES grant for youth 11 to 14 with Autism Spectrum Disorders to help them build knowledge and skills to improve their social competence.

The framework includes five aspects of development: curriculum, places, story, orthotics and teaching & learning tools. Each aspect of the framework will be illustrated and rationalized through examples from the development of iSocial.

One Sentence Summary: A framework is offered for constructing game-based 3D virtual environments that guide students to learning objectives.

PAPER:

Surrogate Embodied Learning in MUVEs: Enhancing Memory and Motivation through Embodiment

Authors:  Saadia A. Khan 1 †, and John B. Black 1 †

Affiliations:

1 Teachers College, Columbia University.

† Department of Human Development, Teachers College, Columbia University, 525 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027.

Abstract:

We investigated the effects of positive embodied affect and embodied learning environments on adult learners’ memory of novel historical text, motivation, near transfer, and far transfer.  Participants were randomly assigned to three types of learning environments: Surrogate Embodiment in a multiuser virtual environment (MUVE), Imagined Embodiment, and No Embodiment.  

Half the participants in each learning condition received a positive Embodied Affect manipulation while the other half (control) did not.  The results revealed significant main effects for Embodied Affect and Type of Learning Environment.  

The results suggest that (a) Surrogate Embodiment enhances memory, motivation, near transfer, and far transfer more than No Embodiment; (b) Surrogate Embodiment enhances memory, and near transfer more than Imagined Embodiment; and (c) positive Embodied Affect with Surrogate Embodiment further enhances memory and transfer.

One Sentence Summary: Our pilot study results suggest that embodied affect and surrogate embodiment in MUVEs enhance learning and motivation.

PAPER:

Mediated Dialogues through Multiple Networked Avatars

Authors: Charles Hughes 1, Daniel Mapes 1

Affiliations:

1 Synthetic Reality Laboratory, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL  32816.

Abstract:

The term Avatar usually refers to a single virtual character that a user controls and employs as a visual persona in some virtual world. For our purposes, we consider an extended context in which a single individual controls a team of virtual characters, jumping in and out of the skins of these various virtual entities.

The choice of which character is puppeteered at any given time depends on the scenarios goals, the story elements developed to achieve these goals, and the focus of current interactions. This paper presents a paradigm for control of multiple avatars in the context of training, education and entertainment, with a particular emphasis on interpersonal skills training.

One Sentence Summary: We present research in digital puppetry-based technology for use in assessment, education, training and rehabilitation.

PAPER:

Active Learning in a Digital Dome with the Living Forest

Authors:  A. Schloss 1, J. Jacobson 2, K. Handron 2

Affiliations:

1 Earth System Research Center, Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans and Space, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH USA.

2 PublicVR, 333 Lamartine St., Jamaica Plain, MA, 02130.  http://publicvr.org

Abstract:

The Living Forest is an interactive virtual environment developed for large-screen formats, especially the all-digital portable dome theaters. Our portable Discovery Dome travels to K-12 schools and other settings to host teacher-led learning activities for audiences of up to 30 students.

The Living Forest provides a compelling virtual representation of a functioning ecology over 100 years of forest growth. Students and/or the teacher use a standard game controller to navigate, step the forest through its growth stages, and change season. Significantly, participants use simulated measuring tools to gather information about trees and other features much as a forester would in real life. The Living Forest also works on a standard desktop, web-delivered, so that students can go home and continue to work with it.

We developed the forest as part of a 3-year “My Dome” project funded by the National Science Foundation and dedicated to interactive learning in digital dome theaters that engages young people in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math topics. Preliminary evaluations show that the Living Forest is effective for teaching environmental science in the classroom and in informal settings including scout troop activities and in the museum.

One Sentence Summary: The Living Forest is an interactive virtual environment for digital dome theaters  that supports active learning of STEM topics such as forest ecology in the environmental and sustainability sciences.

PAPER:

An Exploration of 360° Film and Immersive Environments for Educational Purposes

Authors: Karol Kwiatek 1

Affiliations:

1 School of Architecture, Design and Environment, Faculty of Arts, University of Plymouth

 

Abstract:

The paper focuses on the exploration of immersive environments where 360° imagery and 360° video provide a potential for projects in education. ‘Discover Krakow’, 360° film produced for the display on immersive screens, has educational values as it refers to historical events and geographical facts of the city that the spectator is exploring during the narrative journey.

A collaborative group-based learning environment delivered over immersive environments should motivate students to collect more information about the topic rather than memorize information. Object-based panoramic interactive narrative offers the possibility for the observer to make decisions about what supplemental information need to be presented, therefore seems to be a promising concept for edutainment, because it links interactive narratives with immersive environments.

One Sentence Summary: An exploration of immersive environments where 360° imagery and 360° video recorded in Krakow in Poland provide a potential for projects in education.

NOTE: THIS PAPER WAS PRESENTED AT iED 2011 AND AS SUCH WILL NOT BE PRESENTED AT iED 2012. IT IS NOW AVAILABLE THROUGH THE JOURNAL OF IMMERSIVE EDUCATION (JIED).

        

4. PRESENTATIONS

PRESENTATION:

Questing The 7 C’s: Integrating Collaboration, Creativity, Critical Thinking And Computing In Cross-Cultural Community To Engage Diverse Learners In Game Development

 

Authors:  J. Richter 1, J. Bailey 2

 

Affiliations:

1 Center for Advanced Technology in Education, University of Oregon, Eugene, Oregon.

2 Lane Community College, Eugene, Oregon.

 

Abstract:

Presenting results of a four year project funded by the National Science Foundation's "Advanced Technology in Education" grant program, this session focuses on the curricular framework created specifically to attract more non-traditional students into the STEM field of computer programming and three years of design-based efforts through Lane Community College's Game and Simulation Development program through use of Second Life, OpenSim, and web-based tools.

This online curriculum framework is predicated on "Three C's": Collaboration, Creativity, and Computing -- manifested through four distinct courses: "Introduction to Virtual Worlds" (a general elective intended to attract and engage non-typical computer programming students), "Intermediate Virtual Worlds", "Introduction to Game Development", and "Intermediate Game Development". Two other “C” dimensions of the framework – those of Critical thinking and Cross-Cultural understanding are further emphasized.

The Quest-based framework will be showcased with case examples of student work, highlighting challenges, key findings, student-created products, and quantitative/qualitative analysis. Invitations to high schools and community colleges worldwide to make use of and collaborate with Lane Community College on this growing game development community will be extended through the NorthWest Americas immersive Education network.

 

One Sentence Summary: Cultivation of community in virtual worlds may be effective to attract non-traditional students to game development and computer programming.

 

 

 

PRESENTATION:

The 10 Cube Challenge: Using Virtual Worlds to Foster Creative Thinking

 

Authors: Matthew Worwood † and Frank LaBanca †

 

Affiliations:

† Center for 21st Century Skills at EDUCATION CONNECTION, Litchfield, CT

 

Abstract:

3D virtual worlds foster creativity through the development of a creativity skill set, as identified by E. Paul Torrance. Using a blended learning approach, which leverages both face-to-face and computer-mediated interactions, high school students participated in scaffolded curricular inquiry-based activities that introduced basic mathematic principals to working in 3D environments, while deliberately providing students with an opportunity to develop creative thinking. Entitled the 10 cube challenge, students were required to develop a model using exactly 10 cube, or cubid shaped, primitive objects to replicate the shape of a real world object.

 

One Sentence Summary: The 10 cube challenge, a 3D virtual world activity, engaged students to utilize mathematical principles while developing creative thinking.

 

 

 

PRESENTATION:

Resident Evil 5 and General Education in Singaporean Classroom

Author:  Boon-Yong Kwok 1 †

Affiliations:

1         Author Bio:

                Boon-Yong Kwok, BA(Hons), PGDE, has been a lecturer at the School of Communication, Arts and Social Sciences in Singapore Polytechnic since 2010, teaching and developing modules in the General Education and Communication Skills curricula. Prior to that, he spent about three and a half years teaching General Paper and coaching Project Work at a junior college in Singapore.

His current research interests include the use of technology, commercial electronic and table-top games in teaching and learning, arts, popular music, and language and education issues in Singapore.

†              School of Communication, Arts and Social Sciences

Singapore Polytechnic

500 Dover Road

Singapore 139651

T: 65-6870-8229

F: 65-6772-1955

 

Abstract:

This paper looks at a commercial video game as a learning tool in two Singaporean classroom contexts, specifically a General Certificate of Education Advanced Level H1 General Paper (A-Level H1GP) class in a junior college and a General Education class in a polytechnic. Conclusions drawn from Katrin Becker (2006) will be tested in context, a context where racial harmony is valued by many and protected by law while its residents try not to be consumed by the xenophobic virus that has turned a segment of the population against the others over the past few years (albeit to a zero-violence extent.)

 

One Sentence Summary: Students were engaged in social/world issues with the use of the game in class and were better positioned for discussions.

 

 

 

 

PRESENTATION:

Open Wonderland Showcase

 

Authors: Nicole Yankelovich 1 with members of the Open Wonderland Community

Affiliations:

1  Open Wonderland Foundation and WonderBuilders, Inc.

 

Abstract:

In this session, members of the Open Wonderland community from around the world who are not able to attend the Summit in person will talk about or demonstrate their work live from within a Wonderland world. The world will be comprised of different virtual spaces donated by Community members for this interactive tour. The tour will also include demonstrations of the new features created collaboratively by developers in the open source community who write code together in-world each week during Wonderland Wednesday sessions.

 

One Sentence Summary: Live in-world demonstration of Open Wonderland virtual worlds and features by members of the open source community.

 

 

 

PRESENTATION:

Espurnik 3D Network, The Knowledge Virtual World. Real 21st Century Skills Classroom Experiences Based On Opensim And Aurora-Sim

 

Authors: J. Marín 1, 2  

Affliations:

1 Institut de Ciències de l’Educació de la Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona

2 Departament d’Ensenyament de la Generalitat de Catalunya

 

Abstract:

Real classroom experiences are introduced in this presentation. All these experiences have been developed in a very special framework, the new Espurnik environment, which is based on an OpenSim platform and has been launched by Institut de Ciències de l’Educació de la Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona and supported by the education administration.

Primary school and secondary school teachers have developed the Espurnik environment project and all the experiences presented here from the very beginning. Espurnik is an engaging project with an impressive growing potential that is part of an educational network, Espurn@, involving over 10,000 users. This network is composed of students and teachers of primary and secondary schools in the Barcelona area (Catalonia) that interact and collaborate among themselves in order to develop a huge diversity of participatory activities and cooperative innovating projects.

The classroom experiences being shown cover all knowledge fields, from languages to social sciences, science, mathematics or music. Besides the traditional curricular contents, the OpenSim environment allows users to work on 21st century skills. Users can be really creative, can constantly apply critical thinking and can learn to learn in order to solve problems in a telecollaborative way at any time and innovation and ITC skills are an intrinsic part of the whole work.

 

One Sentence Summary:  Espurnik experiences are real 21st century skills classroom experiences based on OpenSim and applied in primary and secondary schools.

 

 

PRESENTATION:  

Virtual Spaces For Online Role-Play: Combining 2D And 3D Worlds

 

Authors: Michael Gardner 1

 

Affiliations:

1 University of Essex, UK.

 

Abstract: The presentation explores the use of virtual worlds to support online role-play as a collaborative learning activity. It describes some of the challenges involved in building online role-play environments in a virtual world and presents some of the ideas being explored by the +Spaces project in the role-play applications being developed.

 

One Sentence Summary: Supporting structured learning activities in virtual worlds.

 

 

 

 

PRESENTATION:

Java Learning Path in Immersive Education

Authors: Caron Newman

Affiliations:

Oracle Academy, Oracle Corporation


Abstract:

Come learn about the Oracle Academy’s new Java curriculum for secondary schools – Java Fundamentals and Java Programming.  Conceived to help educators awaken and deepen students' interest in Java, Computer Science and Engineering, the curriculum is free and complete with lecture materials, labs, assessments, and projects. It is also fun, engaging, easy to use, and aligns to the Oracle Certified Associate Java Programmer certification and the Advanced Placement (AP) Computer Science A exam in the U.S.

The Senior Curriculum Manager will describe and demonstrate the interactive, project-based curriculum and associated technologies Alice3, Greenfoot and Eclipse. She will describe how creating animations and games are used to teach the fundamentals of Java. She will also explain how you or your school can register for the course and the no-cost professional development opportunity. The course teaches object-oriented programming to students with little or no programming experience.

PRESENTATION:

Pedagogy in Fantasy World Design

 

Authors: Stefan Rasporich

Affiliations:

Calgary Arts Academy

Abstract: What can be learned from my experiment with a new model of teaching and learning based on student-designed fantasy worlds?  Students at the junior high campus of the Calgary Arts Academy charter school use Minecraft, the arts and a wiki to collaborate and present their work. All learning is framed within a larger game where students complete missions to develop a variety of skills.  The focus of the game is creativity, collaboration, citizenship and curriculum. The long-term goal to create an overarching narrative in their fantasy world based on the mythic dramatic structure of the "Hero's Journey,  prevalent in many Hollywood commercial films.

 

PRESENTATION:

Virtual Forensic Learning Lab Series

Authors: Ann W. Burgess, Allen G. Burgess, & Andrew Richardson

Affiliations:

1 Boston College Connell School of Nursing, Chestnut hill, MA.

2 Data Integrity, Inc., West Newton, MA.

3 Data Integrity, Inc., West Newton, MA.

Abstract:  

The VFLLS is a series of 6 different crime scene cases in a virtual game environment.  The games use computer models and actual crime scene photographs that provide students a 3-dimensional walk-thru of a virtual crime scene collecting evidence, taking photographs and reporting results back to the instructor.  

The lab to be demonstrated, Tinsel Man, is a local murder case that was unsolved for two years before a suspect was identified.  The lab is designed to provide the student the simulated experience in the collection of evidence in three locations - the body location, an apartment, and the basement of the apartment building.  

Once the evidence is collected at all sites, it is taken back to a virtual crime lab where the student simulates using crime lab equipment to perform comparisons and analysis of the evidence collected to the actual lab equipment print outs.

One Sentence Summary: The lab game provides a 3-dimensional walk-thru of an actual crime scene.

 

PRESENTATION:

Modeling Eating Behaviors Through Mixed-Reality

 

Authors: J. Dorbolo, K. Hescock

Affiliations:

Technology Across the Curriculum, Oregon State University

Abstract:

Combining classroom activity, immersive environment simulation, and augmented reality we have produced a mixed-reality proof-of-concept.  This mixed-reality system is designed to produce interventions in student eating behaviors toward healthier choices.  Social-Cognitive Theory is the basis of the design.  Enhancing perceived self-efficacy and vicarious learning are key objectives.  The project raises a theoretical and design question about transferability of behaviors between domains.

 

One Sentence Summary:

We produced a mixed-reality system based in Social-Cognitive Theory designed to inform and guide learner eating choices and behaviors.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5. POSTERS

POSTER:

Activating Advanced Learners – Integrating Simulation into the Nursing Synthesis Curriculum at Boston College

 

Authors:  A. Smith 1, CNM, DNP, C. Toronto 1, RN, MS and J. Foley 1, MS

 

Affiliations:

1 Boston College Connell School of Nursing.

 

Abstract:  

Educators strive to provide their students with innovative meaningful learning experiences.  The faculty of Boston College’s Connell School of Nursing had a vision to integrate simulation based education into the undergraduate Nursing Synthesis course.  This course is the senior capstone clinical course.  There are one hundred and fifty students annually enrolled in this course.  They are placed in individual precepted clinical placements in a variety of different nursing specialties.

The process of identifying the needs of this unique cohort of students was multi-faceted.  Innovative methods were used to integrate simulation into this multi specialty advanced level undergraduate nursing course.  Student and faculty feedback was positive and has resulted in the inclusion of this program in the Synthesis curriculum.   The proposed poster will describe this process of identifying student and faculty needs as well as the creative design of such a simulation curriculum to meet all of these needs.

 

One Sentence Summary:  The proposed poster will describe the pedagogical process involved in the development and implementation of a multi specialty, advanced level simulation based educational learning experience.

 

POSTER:

The Possible Role Of ‘Serious Cognitive Gaming’ In Health Care

 

Authors:  Sjoerd de Vries 1,  2, Mirjam Eekhof-de Boer  1, Sanne Minkels  1, Mathilde Thasing  1, Peter Goossens  2

 

Affiliations:

1  Saxion University of Applied Sciences, School of Applied Psychology, Deventer, The Netherlands.

2  Saxion University of Applied Sciences, Research Centre for Health, Social Work & Technology, Deventer, The Netherlands.

 

Abstract:

Popular brain training games such as Nintendo´s Brainage™ suggest that mental capacities can be trained by repetitive mental exercise. Although evidence for a lot of these popular games is scarce, there is a new line of research that suggests that working memory, a capacity closely linked to general intelligence, can be improved by training. The fact that these cognitive functions have a major role in daily living, for instance for planning and organizing daily tasks around the house, medication adherence and in general in leading a more independent life, makes research into the effectiveness of ‘serious cognitive gaming’ especially relevant.

In this paper the results of a short cognitive working memory training will be discussed in light of the implication that ‘serious cognitive gaming’ could have for independent functioning in elderly and the psychiatric population.

 

One Sentence Summary: Serious cognitive gaming could be used for tackling age related cognitive decline and might also have potential in other health care domains.

 

 

 

POSTER:

Assisting the Last of the Luddites:  Immersive Professional Development for Educational Technologists, via a Quasi Alternate Reality Game (qARG)

 

Authors: Birdie Champ, B.S., M.Ed., CG(ASCP)

 

Affiliations: University of Massachusetts         

 

Abstract:  

To alleviate the dearth of pedagogical training available for educational technologists, we have designed a quasi alternate reality game (qARG) with a process knowledge goal of teaching and motivating teachers, coupled with a content knowledge goal of using accessible, common technologies, such as mobile devices, blogs, project management systems, social media, and websites.  

Last of the Luddites has been accepted by the Technology in Education Partnership of Massachusetts, and will be played with an estimated 300 participants at the Technology in Education:  2012 Conference and Expo, to be held in June.  It is a serious game with a goal-based scenario framework.

 

One Sentence Summary: A quasi-alternate reality game (qARG) for educational technologists to gain pedagogical skills.

 

 

 

POSTER:

Interactive Environments as Pedagogical Tools: Learning from Worked Examples in Scratch and Alice

 

Authors: Florence Sullivan, Ph.D., Birdie Champ, B.S., M.Ed., CG(ASCP), Rafael Pacheco, M.Ed.

Affiliations:

University of Massachusetts

Abstract: 

Our evolving ternary model of student motivation is informed by students learning ICT with Scratch and Alice programming languages.  This particular branch of our research focuses on a learner’s improved sense of competence, based on their development of self-regulated learning (SRL) skills, which include metacognitive abilities, as well as affective and motivational responses to one’s metacognitive activities. Both Scratch and Alice are robust object-oriented animation programming tools, with a major difference in the amount of worked examples provided for learners to peruse.  Scratch provides thousands of worked examples in the form of an online community forum where learners share and comment on animation projects through a share/comment website.  Conversely, Alice does not have a community forum, and provides only ten tutorial samples.  Our ongoing research is facilitated in an animation club held afterschool with middle school students in an urban area.  We are researching:  (1) students as they self-explain while engaged with worked examples in computational media environments, (2) any measurable differences in students’ comprehension of computer science concepts when they engage in self-explanation vs. when they do not, and (3) how do we best measure students’ self-explanation when working in Scratch and/or Alice?

 

 

6. PANELS

PANEL:
The Challenge and Reward of Full, Augmented and Mixed Reality (FAM) in the Classroom

Panelists:

Jeffrey Jacobson, PublicVR and iED FAM.TWG co-chair

Victor Callaghan, University of Essex, United Kingdom

Jon Dorbolo, Oregon State University and iED Oregon Board Member

Jennifer B. Elliott, University of Cincinnati

Marc Lalley, iGlobe Inc.

PANEL:
Commercial Video Games as Stealth Learning Environments : What Do They Teach Us?

Panelists:

Dan Green, Oracle, iED MidAmerica Board Member and iED K-12.TWG co-chair

Toni Alatalo, realXtend Association and Playsign Ltd.

Boon-Yong Kwok,  Singapore Polytechnic

Stefan Rasporich, Calgary Arts Academy

Darin Hughes, University of Central Florida

 

7. WORKSHOPS

 

WORKSHOP:

Building Logic in Scratch, Minecraft and Java for Gamers [HANDS-ON]

 

Authors:  Daniel Green 1, 2, 3

Affiliations:

1 Oracle Corporation http://www.oracle.com.

2 Immersive Education Initiative K-12 Working Group http://ImmersiveEducation.org

3 Kansas City Computer Club http://jccccomputerclub.wikispaces.com.

 

Abstract:

Scratch is a 2D drag and drop block environment for early childhood and younger students to create their own games, projects and animations. Minecraft is a game about placing blocks to build anything you can imagine. In 'creative' mode, you have an infinite bucket of Lego-like building blocks to build or mine whatever you'd like to work on with friends in world. You can think of Minecraft as the Scratch version of an online virtual world.  

Minecraft is likely the most successful Java game of all time and students are learning Java just to modify Minecraft.  Workshop attendees will bring their laptops and be able to try building things in Minecraft including redstone circuits to control doors and mine cart train tracks involving AND / OR / NOT and other logical operators to construct circuits.  

Attendees will also experiment with building similar circuits using Scratch including AND / OR / NOT and other operator scratch blocks to control doors and tracks mirroring what we did in Minecraft.  There will be discussion and demonstration of extending Minecraft by writing game mods using Java as well.

 

One Sentence Summary: Workshop attendees will be able to try building things in Minecraft involving AND / OR / NOT operators to construct circuits and build similar circuits using Scratch operator blocks to control doors and tracks.

Downloads: 

Scratch 1.4 http://scratch.mit.edu

Minecraft http://www.minecraft.net

NetBeans 7.1.2 http://www.netbeans.org

Picoboard http://www.picocricket.com/whichpicoboard.html

 

 

 

WORKSHOP:

EcoMUVE: Learning About Ecosystems Through Immersion in Virtual Worlds [HANDS-ON]

 

Author: Shari J. Metcalf 1

Affiliations:

1 Harvard Graduate School of Education

Abstract:

The EcoMUVE curriculum is a collaborative, inquiry-based, simulated ecosystem experience to support learners developing an understanding of complex causality in ecosystems. It consists of two two-week MUVE-based modules, Pond and Forest; each module centers around an immersive, simulated ecosystem that represents a complex ecological scenario. Pilot data from EcoMUVE has shown promising results on gains in student learning and motivation. This workshop will give participants the opportunity to experience EcoMUVE from the student’s perspective through a hands-on experience.

 

One Sentence Summary: EcoMUVE uses immersive virtual environments to teach middle school students about ecosystems and causal patterns.

 

Downloads: http://ecomuve.gse.harvard.edu/JoinEcoMUVE2.php

 

WORKSHOP:

Learn to Build an Open Wonderland World [HANDS-ON]

 

Authors: Nicole Yankelovich 1

Affiliations:

1  Open Wonderland Foundation and WonderBuilders, Inc.

 

Abstract:

In this two-hour hands-on world building session, we will start by reviewing a range of Open Wonderland features. For the bulk of the session, we will focus on  building a virtual space from scratch. By the end of the session, attendees will be able to add content to the world including graphics, video, slide shows, 3D models, and shared application, arrange that content, and add "capabilities" such as audio, tooltips, clickable links, security, and a variety of others.

For this workshop you are encouraged to bring your own laptop. Windows, Mac, or Linux are all fine, but please check the minimum system requirements in the Open Wonderland FAQ to be sure your laptop will work.

 

One Sentence Summary: In this hands-on world building session, we will review Open Wonderland features and learn to build a world from scratch.

 

Downloads: http://www.openwonderland.org

 

 

WORKSHOP:

Kinect, Wedo, Picoboards and Alternative Inputs With Scratch [HANDS-ON]

 

Authors:  Daniel Green 1, 2, 3

 

Affiliations:

1 Oracle Corporation http://www.oracle.com

2 Immersive Education Initiative K-12 Working Group http://ImmersiveEducation.org

3 Kansas City Computer Club http://jccccomputerclub.wikispaces.com

 

Abstract:

This workshop is an opportunity for teachers to bring their laptops and go hands on with Scratch and WeDo and Picoboards and learn how to also leverage the Kinect camera with Scratch projects as well.  The level of student engagement we're able to get with scratch and picoboards in class is worth relating and sharing as an introduction and to provide context for this workshop.

 

One Sentence Summary: Workshop attendees will be able to try building things in Scratch involving Picoboards and the Kinect camera leveraging alternative inputs in their projects.

 

Scratch 1.4 http://scratch.mit.edu

 

 

WORKSHOP:

Math Problem Solving with Online Coaches [HANDS-ON]

 

Authors:  Robert W. Maloy 1, Katelyn Sassorossi 2, Sharon A. Edwards 1, Megan Strathearn 1

 

Affiliations: 1 University of Massachusetts Amherst - School of Education,  2 University of Massachusetts Amherst - Department of Mathematics and Statistics

 

Abstract:  

This workshop discusses how attitudes, behaviors and learning outcomes of elementary students have affected development of an online math tutoring and problem-solving system called 4MALITY (4-Coach Active Learning Intelligent Tutoring System).  4MALITY features online coaches who offer problem-solving strategies from different viewpoints:  close reading, number computation, strategic thinking, and problem visualization.  More than 300 fourth and fifth grade students in three states used the system during the 2011-2012 school year.  

Their responses reveal strategies for supporting math learning in virtual and face-to-face environments.  

While initially reluctant to consult online coaches before solving math word problems, most students increased their use of coaches over the course of multiple learning modules. Students made purposeful choices to use or not use coaches—some adopted a favorite learning companion, some used different coaches for different problems, and some consistently tried solving problems without coaching assistance.  Students accessed the visual learning coach most often, responding positively to short animations demonstrating mathematical relationships in action. Students attained gains in math learning from pre-test to post-test, with girls and students with special educational needs showing the most improvement.

 

One Sentence Summary:  Students offered online math tutoring liked learning companions, multiple problem approaches, and short animations demonstrating math operations.

 

Downloads: http://cadmium.cs.umass.edu/4mality/

 

 

WORKSHOP:

Build It! Asteroids Game Workshop - Computational Thinking Concepts Using Scratch [HANDS-ON]

 

Authors: Daniel Green 1,2,3

Affiliations:

1 Oracle Corporation http://www.oracle.com.

2 Immersive Education Initiative K-12 Working Group http://immersiveeducation.org.

3 Kansas City Computer Club http://jccccomputerclub.wikispaces.com.

Abstract: 

This workshop is an opportunity for educators to walk through the phases of developing an intermediate to advanced level game, "Asteroids" which they can use in class as a gaming project with students. Discussion during the workshop will focus on computational thinking concepts, practices and perspectives for this particular game, and suggestions for students to modify and customize the project to make it their own and apply their creativity throughout the project. We will also cover how to embed the project into a web page to be used as interactive content in students' web pages.

Outline of the game building workshop is as follows:

Phase One: Get Moving

Scratch blocks covered include motion, looks, sound, control and sensing blocks Concepts covered include angle of ship turn, steps to move ship as speed of the ship Gaming concepts covered include rocket turning, rocket thrust, and movement

Phase Two: Handling Off Screen scenarios

Scratch blocks covered include motion, control, and operators Concepts covered include x/y coordinates of ship position

Gaming concepts covered include dealing with screen wrap around

Phase Three: Collisions

Scratch blocks covered include motion, looks, sound, control, sensing and operators

Concepts covered include variables, conditional logic, and event handling

Gaming concepts covered include dealing with the rocket ship crashing into asteroids as well as asteroids crashing into the ship

Phase Four: Shooting

Scratch blocks covered include motion, looks, sound, control, sensing and operators Concepts covered include message passing, relational expressions

Gaming concepts covered include ship shooting a bullet, asteroids getting hit by bullets

Phase Five: Momentum

Scratch blocks covered include motion, looks, control, sensing, operators

Concepts covered include trigonometric functions, velocity and acceleration

Gaming concepts covered include gliding based on momentum and thrust acceleration

Topics covered will focus on programming as problem solving for students to use Scratch as a tool for game and story creation. Key to this approach is addressing Computational Thinking conepts, practices and perspectives during project development. Students are encouraged to "make it their own" by customizing the project in terms of appearance and game settings. Time permitting, examples of concepts such as sequence, looping, parallelism, events, conditionals, operators, variables and lists will be discussed in conjunction with everyday items. Particular attention will be paid to concept definitions, why the concepts are useful, showing demonstrations in Scratch and providing common misconceptions or mix-ups for each concept.

Downloads: Scratch 1.4 http://scratch.mit.edu

 

WORKSHOP:

Build It! Little Crab Game Workshop - Computational Thinking Concepts Using Scratch [HANDS-ON]

 

Authors: Daniel Green 1,2,3

Affiliations:

1 Oracle Corporation http://www.oracle.com.

2 Immersive Education Initiative K-12 Working Group http://immersiveeducation.org.

3 Kansas City Computer Club http://jccccomputerclub.wikispaces.com.

Abstract: 

This workshop is an opportunity for educators to walk through the phases of developing a beginning to intermediate level game, "Little Crab" which they can use in class as a gaming project with students. Discussion during the workshop will focus on computational thinking concepts, practices and perspectives for this particular game, and suggestions for students to modify and customize the project to make it their own and apply their creativity throughout the project. We will also cover how to embed the project into a web page to be used as interactive content in students' web pages.

Outline of the game building workshop is as follows:

Phase One: Get Moving

Scratch blocks covered include motion and control blocks Concepts covered include movement, turning and event handling Gaming concepts covered include basic movement on screen

Phase Two: Add Worms for Crabs to eat

Scratch blocks covered include looks, sound, control and sensing

Concepts covered include collision, visibility and audio

Gaming concepts covered include a sprite capturing / eating another sprite

Phase Three: Add Predators to eat the Crabs

Scratch blocks covered include motion, looks, sound, control, sensing and operators Concepts covered are the same as the previous step

Gaming concepts covered include a predator capturing / eating the main control sprite

Phase Four: Sprite Animation

Scratch blocks covered include looks, control, operators and variables Concepts covered include sprite animation

Gaming concepts covered include animation during sprite movement

Phase Five: Game Over

Scratch blocks covered include motion, looks, sound, control, sensing, operators and variables

Concepts covered include messaging and variable manipulation

Gaming concepts covered include ending the game on certain conditions

Topics covered will focus on programming as problem solving for students to use Scratch as a tool for game and story creation. Key to this approach is addressing Computational Thinking concepts, practices and perspectives during project development. Students are encouraged to "make it their own" by customizing the project in terms of appearance and game settings. Time permitting, examples of concepts such as sequence, looping, parallelism, events, conditionals, operators, variables and lists will be discussed in conjunction with everyday items. Particular attention will be paid to concept definitions, why the concepts are useful, showing demonstrations in Scratch and providing common misconceptions or mix-ups for each concept. 

 Downloads: Scratch 1.4 http://scratch.mit.edu

 

 

  

8. DEMOS

DEMO:

Cyberlearning and Second Language Conversational Competence

 

Author: Mary Beth Ogulewicz

 

Affiliations: Springfield Technical Community College

 

Abstract: 

Springfield Technical Community College along with Wonderbuilders is creating a virtual college campus to increase opportunities for English as a Second Language students to practice English. The work explores using virtual worlds to increase conversational competence, student engagement and college matriculation.

 

One Sentence Summary:  A virtual college campus assists second language acquisition.

DEMO:

The Cincinnati Riverfront 1848: A Historical Immersive Experience

Author:  Jennifer B. Elliott

Affiliations: University of Cincinnati, Assistant Professor.

Abstract:

This project is a prototype build of augmented reality app for the iPad. In this first phase, the concept uses a set of digitized daguerreotype plates taken of the Cincinnati Riverfront in 1848. At a time when most photographs were confined to portraits, this innovative work attracted worldwide attention and survives as the oldest comprehensive photograph of an American city (http://1848.cincinnatilibrary.org/).

With the use of the iPad, users will be able to experience the panorama in the context of the modern-day riverfront setting (phase I). Connecting with the mobile device accelerometer  (phase II) will allow the position of the image to move with the user, and as they turn, they are able to see the panoramic image of the riverfront. This image of the modern-day waterfront would be over-laid with the images from 1848 panorama, allowing users to see the immediate difference between the current scape and that from years passed. Additionally, in the full version of this application, users will be able to zoom into the photos and interact with embedded historical content across different points on the screen.

One Sentence Summary:

This demo is an augmented reality prototype that teaches history in context with primary source images of the Cincinnati riverfront from 1848.

DEMO:

Blending Informal and Formal Learning in Offline and Online Environments

Author:  Karen P. Kaun

Affiliations: Knowledge iTrust, Inc.

Abstract:

Maker Kids is a formal and informal STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) learning program for youth with an online/offline community modeled in part on Dale Dougherty’s Maker movement.  The program has been piloting with 28 teachers and 700 youth in Bronx, NY schools during the school day.  We are exploring how to immerse youth in “Making" in blended environments with toolkits to assist them to envision and create online and to transfer their skills and knowledge offline.  Students who participate in the program have demonstrated an increased interest in science.

One Sentence Summary:

How can we immerse youth in making in blended online/offline “Making” for innovation in STEM?

 

 

9. OUTLIERS

OUTLIER:

Innovative Laboratory Component for Social Science Courses

Authors: Andrey Liscovich

Affiliations:

Harvard University

Abstract:

The laboratory is a key element of natural science courses. Labs allow students to manipulate and internalize scientific concepts by merging theories learned in lecture with observations gathered from experimentation. Instruction in the social sciences, however, typically never includes a laboratory component. At best, some social science courses occasionally feature classroom demonstrations. These demonstrations are performed by the professor and students participate as subjects. That is, students play a role similar to that of a pendulum in a physics class or a solution in a chemistry lab, not that of the experimenter. Yet even these demonstrations are difficult to carry out. The teaching staff currently must employ time-consuming and labor-intensive practices to collect and tabulate student responses.

                         

Unsurprisingly, running substantive economics experiments in the same way that it is done in the natural sciences that is, as part of a separate lab component is virtually impossible at present for logistical and financial reasons. Existing experimental software is either extremely rigid or requires extensive programming knowledge, and as such does not allow for the rapid development of economics experiments within the span of a single class session. Furthermore, unlike demonstrations, experiments would require recruitment and management of a large number of subjects. Payments to these subjects using conventional procedures would likely reach several thousand dollars per experiment.

 

We would like to propose a solution that would allow instructors to incorporate a lab component into economics courses. Our solution is based on the observation that experiments in which subjects interact with each other in real time are, by definition, multiplayer games. Hence, the technology that is used by the gaming industry to create multiplayer online games can also be used to develop experiments in the social sciences. At the Human Nature Lab at Harvard we are currently developing a software platform for experimental research that leverages this technology. It allows researchers to use an intuitive visual scripting tool to quickly assemble full-fledged economics experiments from a variety of modular building blocks. This tool does not presuppose any programming experience. At the same time, it leaves open the option of fully customizing existing blocks and creating new ones with a mainstream general purpose programming language (C#). This approach would make the software accessible to all users without sacrificing its flexibility and scope.  

 

Apart from developing an experiment in lab, each student would need to find her own subjects. Traditional methods of subject recruitment used by on-campus research laboratories would not be feasible given the time limits of a single lab session. Students would therefore need to recruit remote subjects online. The success of experimental trials using online subjects depends critically on whether the subjects understand and complete the entire game. This depends almost entirely on the clarity and visual appeal of the game. Our software uses a professional game engine to deliver cutting-edge 2D and 3D user interfaces, comparable to those of top App Store and Facebook games.

OUTLIER:

iGlobe PersonalPlanet

Authors: Marc Lalley

Affiliations:

iGlobe Inc.

Abstract:

PersonalPlanet is our new patent-pending 3D spherical display technology that engages the viewer with 3D imagery and innovative user interface software.  Similar to our full spherical display, PersonalPlanet creates highly accurate representations of Earth, celestial bodies, or other interpretive content and has the added advantages of exceedingly high resolution, stellar performance in any lighting situation, and unmatched affordability.  People enjoy viewing the PersonalPlanet because the picture is essentially perfect.

 

The secret behind the PersonalPlanet is a special light diverging optical layer that sits between the viewer and the flat display panel.  These optics warp the appearance of 2D spherical imagery depicted on a flat panel display to appear as a 3D sphere floating in space with extremely accurate depth and perspective, without the need to wear special glasses.  It must be seen to be fully appreciated.

 

PersonalPlanet uses a custom version of iGlobe's innovative graphical user interface.  All interface features present with the iGlobe to display existing and original content are supplied with every PersonalPlanet.

 

PersonalPlanet provides a golden opportunity for your business or organization to create eye-popping experiences for audiences large and small at a fraction of the cost of a full spherical display.

 

Features Include:

  Apple iMac computer and display

  Apple iPad wireless controller  

  Custom iGlobe interface

  Ultra High Resolution

  Enhanced colorspace for vibrant colors

  Real Time Earth with 20 weather layers

  Over 200 NOAA and NASA Science on a Sphere content titles available  

  Custom museum quality wall mounted or desktop display to meet your specific needs  

  High brightness

  The only spherical display able to fully show animated solar data

OUTLIER:

iSee - Education And Collaboration In An Immersive Environment

Authors: Farzad Safaei

Affiliations:

University of Wollongong

Abstract: iSee is a unique and truly collaborative video-based cross-platform technology in a 3D immersive environment. Hundreds of users can simultaneously share ideas and content naturally using real-time high quality multi-point to multi-point video and audio streaming. iSee can be used by individual students (student to student, student to teacher, home to classroom, home to home) or as larger groups (teacher to classroom, classroom to classroom) with any internet connection.

 

iSee releases the need for attendees to come to single rooms with video conferencing equipment, instead participating directly through a laptop or standard computer. The iSee technology enables participants to move freely about the environment rather than being part of a traditional static wall tile, for a more natural interaction.

 

iSee users are represented with framed live video streams and move freely around their environment to form groups for meetings, discussions and presentations. iSee has the ability to open up collaboration nationally and internationally through its multipoint to multipoint video-based meeting environment which operates from a standard computer or laptop with a standard web-cam.  

 

iSee's immersive environment is a game changer for distance learning as it

 

         creates a canvas which connects learners and collaborators rather than acting as a conduit to deliver content

         supports a hundreds of simultaneous (many-to-many) video and audio inputs (compared to nine participants with standard videoconferencing)  

         makes dynamic use of bandwidth - you only receive data for the objects you can see and hear, therefore they work with low bandwidth connections including 3G connections  

         has spatial voice which allows many conversations simultaneously for a more natural collaborative environment

         captures and playback all video and audio for sessions

         allows participants actions to be logged.

         provides young children the ability to see who it is they are interacting with - rich social interaction that is safe and secure

                 

 

iSee is currently in beta-trials with the NSW Department of School Education to teach students from remote and regional schools.

 

The use of the iSee immersive technology will enable education jurisdictions to transform and extend the access to a broad curriculum to students in remote and regional areas.  The iSee immersive learning platform allows for a specialist teacher located anywhere to cost-effectively deliver learning to students living in remote areas. It also means remote schools with small numbers of students wanting to study specialist curriculum areas can offer courses not previously possible. iSee enables students to participate either at school or from home, through the use of their desktop computer or laptop, webcam and internet connection. Students will be able to join students from other schools and regions to collaborate on assignments and undertake lessons where the teacher and other participants are streamed live to their laptop. This ensures a natural and fully immersive experience so large numbers of students can simultaneously participate in lessons, with full access to a managed content sharing solution, all with very low setup costs.

 

Applications of iSee include on-line, and remote and distance education for schools, universities, training colleges and for in-house enterprise training. iSee is being developed by University of Wollongong researchers in collaboration with the Smart Services CRC.

OUTLIER:

The realXtend Platform For Virtual Worlds, Featuring the Smithsonian Latino Virtual Museum's Virtual Watershed Initiative and Other Virtual Worlds

Authors: Toni Alatalo        

Affiliations:

realXtend Association and Playsign Ltd.

Abstract: The realXtend platform is demonstrated in all forms. Main case is the Smithsonian Latino Virtual Museum's Virtual Watershed Initiative, a joint effort by the Immersive Education initiative and the realXtend association. That educative nature environment is published as Creative Commons (CC) licensed 3d models + textures and permissive open source for the scripts. It also features two small games: the Osprey game and the Anchovies game.

 

realXtend provides a completely Open Source development kit for Virtual World applications. The Tundra SDK combines powerful existing libraries from the open source world: the Ogre graphics engine, Bullet for physics, Javascript for scripting and Qt for cross-platform support (runs natively on Windows, Mac and Linux). They are all combined in a unified standard platform for which there is a server and a client application available. The development is coordinated in the realXtend association, which is open for anyone interested in realXtend to join (both companies & other organizations, and individuals).

 

The Smithsonian Latino Virtual Museum's Virtual Watershed Initiative is also suggested as an open source project on its own -- starting from the iED summit. One specific idea for future development is to provide simple tools for school kids to play with different parameters and logic rules for the animal AIs, for example with Scratch (or Alice). The animal 3d models with the nice animations are free to use for non-commercial use (the CC license variant is for non-commercial use). The current animals are: Osprey, Sea bass, Anchovy, Osprey, the Maryland blue grab, White tailed deer + a baby deer and male and female mallards. They have been created with Blender, and are free to use also in other platforms too (Second Life via Collada, Open Wonderland. Sirikata native version also uses Ogre so the assets used with Tundra work directly).

 

Also recent advances from browser based realXtend clients (WebNaali), available both as WebGL (with GLGE) and Flash (with Away3d), are demonstrated. In the end of April 2012, we experimented with a very simple XMPP backed lightweight presence system for very scalable user counts (2000-3000 users on one server, in 50 rooms). This was for the Virtual Berlin Gallery Weekend, which was then left open for public access for early May 2012. That Berlin Gallery world is online for publicly as a Tundra world and this lightweight browser based Flash + XMPP version. The Flash/AIR version is available also as an iOS app for iPhone and iPad, and possibly for Android as well.  It is a commercial business world, the art pieces are actually for sale in the places (which are placed on the map of the city in the virtual world).

 

The Smithsonian Latino Virtual Museum's Virtual Watershed Initiative scene has been tested in Chrome, Firefox and Safari with WebGL using GLGE, the standard WebNaali scenetest worked well after some initial problems.

 

Finally, current state and future plans for the TOY education platform, presented at the iED Summit in earlier years, are presented. Also TOY has greatly benefitted from recent advances in Tundra technology -- for example getting a wide coverage of both Mac and Windows devices supported, and good quality Mumble voice implementation. Also the browser based technologies are now well capable of running the basic TOY functionalities, we may make first tests of that in May to present in June.

 

10. LATE-BREAKING RESEARCH & TECHNOLOGY

TO BE ANNOUNCED

 

11. CHAPTER EVENTS

  1. Immersive Education Chapters Meeting : Europe, Australia, Brazil, MidAmerica,  NorthWest Americas, Oregon, Kansas

 

12. TECHNOLOGY WORKING GROUP EVENTS

  1. Full, Augmented, and Mixed Reality Technology Working Group (FAM.TWG) launch
  2. Game Technology Working Group (GAM.TWG) launch
  3. Mobile, iPAD and Android Technology Working Groups launch
  4. Library Technology Working Group (LIB.TWG) meeting
  5. Tour Boston College Burns and Bapst Libraries and “Walk The Labyrinth” social organized by the Library Technology Working Group (LIB.TWG)

 

13. SOCIAL  EVENTS

  1. Boston Harbor Sunset Cruise
  2. Immersive Education Chapters Board of Governors (BoG) Evening Social